Ukraine Humanitarian Crisis - How to Help People in Ukraine - CARE

Ukraine Humanitarian Crisis

Ukrainian refugees, including many children and women, arrive by trains at Przemyśl station in Poland.

Photo credit: Valerio Muscella

Photo credit: Valerio Muscella

Emergencies

CARE and our partners aim to reach 4 million people with urgent aid.

About the Humanitarian Crisis in Ukraine

In the weeks after the onset of conflict in Ukraine in February 2022, the country’s humanitarian situation has surpassed even the worst-case predicted scenarios. Neighboring countries are seeing huge refugee influxes, largely women and children. More than 5.2 million people, 90% of whom are women and children, have left Ukraine in search of safety. The U.N. is estimating 18 million people will be affected by the conflict, including 7.7 million who are likely to be internally displaced. These figures are based on a volatile and fast-moving situation on the ground, with people urgently seeking safety.

Even prior to the invasion, years of conflict in the Donetsk and Luhansk regions of eastern Ukraine had left 2.9 million people in need of humanitarian assistance and displaced 1.5 million people from their homes. For Ukrainian refugees and internally displaced people, the most immediate needs include food, clean water, shelter and protection from violence, including gender-based violence. In addition to the ongoing conflict, other major challenges for displaced families include the freezing weather, COVID-19 concerns, and access to healthcare, especially for women and the elderly.

Poland is a primary destination for people fleeing the conflict, and the Polish government has set up reception centers and hospitals near crossing points on the 300-mile border. Romania has received more than 750,000 refugees. Other neighboring countries receiving refugees include Moldova, Hungary, and Slovakia.

A man in a bright orange vest stands by an orange sign that reads,
Photo credit: Raegan Hodge/CARE

Watch recordings of our past Ukraine briefings

May 12, 2022

This briefing features updates from Michelle Nunn (President & CEO, CARE) and our partners in Poland. We hear about how we have been responding to the needs of millions of people fleeing the war in Ukraine, with a particular focus on our work in protecting women’s rights.

Watch on YouTube

April 29, 2022

This briefing features real-time updates from Michelle Nunn (President & CEO, CARE) and our partners in Poland. We also hear about how the Ukraine conflict is exacerbating an already fragile global hunger crisis.

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April 15, 2022

This briefing features updates and reflections from Michelle Nunn (President & CEO, CARE) on the time that she and CARE board members have spent in Poland. We also hear from representatives from the Ukraine House, a cultural center along the Polish border that has turned into a shelter for refugees.

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March 30, 2022

This briefing features updates from CARE and our experts in Poland. Speakers include Sarah Taylor Peace (Chief Resource Officer, CARE), Michelle Nunn (President & CEO, CARE), David Gazashvili (Country Director, CARE), and Dr. Wojtek Wilk (President & CEO of Polish Center for International Aid).

Watch on YouTube

How to Help Ukraine – What CARE is Doing

CARE has launched a humanitarian appeal to support the most vulnerable Ukrainians, particularly women-headed households and the elderly. Our goal is to provide life-saving assistance to 4 million people who have been impacted by the conflict.

CARE’s response is regional and leverages partnerships in affected countries. In Poland, CARE is working with Polish Humanitarian Aid (PAH), Polish Centre for International Aid (PCPM), and Ukrainian House. In Ukraine, CARE is working with Charity Foundation Stabilization Support Services (CFSSS), International Renaissance Foundation (IRF), and People in Need (PIN). In Romania, CARE is working with SERA, Federation of Child Protection NGOs (FONC), and Red Cross. In Slovenia, CARE is working with Red Cross.

Our priority is to meet the immediate needs of affected families through the distribution of critical food and water supplies, as well as hygiene kits, cash assistance and psychosocial support. To date, CARE has distributed food in Ukraine and Romania and assisted refugees and host populations in Poland and Romania.

We thank you for considering a generous gift to support these efforts.

*Last updated June 29, 2022

Our latest Ukraine updates

Ukraine Crisis Update: June 9, 2022

The June 9 edition of the CARE Ukraine Crisis Update focuses on how the conflict is driving a world hunger crisis, spotlights some program participants in Ukraine who have received food shipments, plus compares and contrasts the current state of the cities of Kyiv and Lviv.

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Ukraine Crisis Update: April 25, 2022

The April 25 newsletter reports how donations are making a difference for those in need of help due to the conflict in Ukraine. CARE CEO Michelle Nunn and three board members visited the border region, where refugees are still crossing in large numbers, as well as CARE Poland’s operations in Warsaw.

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Ukraine Crisis Update: April 18, 2022

The April 18 newsletter features a photo essay of Ukrainian refugees entering Poland as well as a story on a new program placing Ukrainian teachers and students into Polish schools.

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Ukraine Crisis Update: April 11, 2022

This newsletter update highlights a resort near Lviv, Ukraine, that has turned into a refuge for displaced people, and features an interview with a psychiatrist who recently received training in trauma counseling to better assist Ukrainians.

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Ukraine Crisis Update: April 4, 2022

CARE is working with carefully selected partners in each country receiving refugees, as well as inside Ukraine.

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Ukraine Crisis Update: March 28, 2022

More Ukrainian refugees, most of whom are women, children, and the elderly, stream into Poland, Romania, Slovakia, and Moldova with each passing day. In this newsletter update, CARE shares the stories of some of these refugees.

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